Posts Tagged ‘Advice’

Public Perception

February 23rd, 2010

Scribd Business Model

Today I had an interesting experience in user perception. While following a link to a presentation I was interested, in I arrived at the Scribd site and was greeted with the view shown above. Although the screen capture might not do the blinking neon banner at the bottom justice, I hope that those reading this will share similar sentiments to those I experienced. The content is surrounded by gimmicky advertising that screams desperation to me. If you’ve built a business dependent on advertising muscle enhancers and the chance to win WalMart gift cards then I begin to seriously doubt your future prospects. Maybe I’m being to quick to judge Scribd. After all, I’ve always considered them a reputable company. Its amazing what today’s visit did to my perception. My biggest take away from this experience is the importance of being aware how you’re projecting yourself to your customers. Take a second to view your public presence through your customer’s eyes and make sure there aren’t any metaphorical flashing neon banner ads.

Auditions

December 21st, 2009

 

I was reading through Paul Graham’s “18 Mistakes that Kill Start-ups” essay and found in note #13 an interesting idea and a possible answer to my previous post‘s quandry.

“[13] So how do you know whether you’re in the category of people who should quit their day job, or the presumably larger one who shouldn’t? I got to the point of saying that this was hard to judge for yourself and that you should seek outside advice, before realizing that that’s what we do. We think of ourselves as investors, but viewed from the other direction Y Combinator is a service for advising people whether or not to quit their day job. We could be mistaken, and no doubt often are, but we do at least bet money on our conclusions.”

For those that aren’t familiar with Y Combinator, it is a group that invests early in start-ups and puts them through a kind of boot camp to get them up to speed. Angel and early stage investors can offer an kind of audition of sorts for those of us trying to decide whether to do it full time or not.

 So write up a business plan and submit it to your nearest business plan competition-see if it goes anywhere. If it doesn’t get selected to win it all it doesn’t mean it is a bad idea and you won’t be successful but it can provide you with opposing pespectives that test your level of determination. Maybe even put a chip on your shoulder to prove some folks wrong.

The Huddle Continues

September 25th, 2009

Thanks to all those who provided input into the future of brainhuddle.com. The blog is liked but the posts tend to be mostly theory. Blogs that are visited over and over are those that combine the theory with practice. Preferably that practice should be our own. It tends to have more power to drive traffic and credibility when that happens.

So in order to be true to the original intent throughout the blogs we’re going to chronicle the creation of a start-up among friends. We hope to share our successes and failures; as well as any tips or tricks that we come across. Of course we would appreciate any counsel or advice as we make our way through this journey. In the process we hope to be able to create a way, space, or resources for those that, like us, want to work with your friends to make a difference to someone.

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